Tour Southeastern Arizona During The Summer

I used to live in the Phoenix area for 28 years or so.  Like many of the valley residents, we would take time to go to the Flagstaff  or the Payson to escape the summer heat. We spent time in Cottonwood, Sedona and Prescott  before buying property in Munds Park. We discovered how  a little higher elevation reduced the heat of the day and lead to cooler nights. It also help that the concrete of the city wasn’t around to hold the heat and radiate it back at night. We didn’t really do much traveling to Southern Arizona for a simple reason. We traveled through Yuma on the way to San Diego like most Arizonans. We didn’t consider going to southeastern Arizona because of the prevailing theory that everything south of Phoenix was hotter than Phoenix. We used Yuma for the example.

Then we discovered that here in Cochise County we could find

Monsoon storm at sunset

The monsoon storm that lasts to the sunset always gives some colors for all to enjoy.

elevations that were similar to Cottonwood and Prescott. We also found that the temperatures were similar and that there are pine forested mountains  here that go over 10,000 feet elevation. Not only that, but during the summer, Cochise County gets the monsoon storms earlier than central Arizona. The area actually experiences storms that bring rain up to one or two weeks prior to reaching the metro areas. In fact, on the 16th of June this year we had a storm that dropped rain and hail for almost 30 minutes. The cool rain really felt good. While Phoenix gets the dry haboob that doesn’t reduce the 110+ degree day, St. David will get a half an inch of rain and the temperature will drop into the 80s.  It is really nice and you can sit under the porch and enjoy it.

Now for the news that I want to tell you about.  The Arizona Tourist News has written and article on page 3 of the summer 2012 edition.

AZTN front cover

Down By The River is on the front cover of the paper.

 

The article give you an itinerary for  a 2 day trip to see this area of Cochise County. Down By The River is mentioned in the article and we are noted on the front cover of the paper, along with many of the businesses that we tell our guests about. Actually it might be a little hard to do the tour in two days and be able to see all the things that are available in the area. The AZTN tells about the wineries, San Pedro Observatory and other locations and things to do.

Down By The River B&B is near Tombstone and is the Cochise County Lodging Hub with easy access to all of  the Cochise County attractions. We are a great place for San Pedro River birding at the BnB since we are at the river and just at the north end of the San Pedro River National Conservation Area.

We thought that this would be a grand opportunity for people that haven’t been in the area come down to visit us and do the tour of Cochise County.  To that end we have decided to celebrate and offer to future guests a special from now until the end of September of 2012. If you go to our website and click on the specials (or to save time clink on this link) and read about our special.  Follow the instruction and you will know what needs to be done to get the special deal. Hope that you will consider viewing a wet monsoon and not have to watch  all the dry ones that are normal for the Phoenix area.

One Response to “Tour Southeastern Arizona During The Summer” Comments are currently closed.

  1. jenifer jordan says:

    Added to the heat strife, the increase in asphalt roadway and heat holding building materials has added enough heat to throw the storm track back into Mexico and make it much harder to move the monsoon moisture to AZ and NM as well as Southern California that used to see rain in the summer occasionally and has not since the rise of “civilization” with increased human arrival in the 80’s. Until this is adjusted one must water at 10am. and 12pm and 1pm to insure adequate draw to create the storms necessary to cool the area off and allow the storm track to return.

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